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MAES NEWS LETTER 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

A, James Ebel, Editor, Station WILL* Urbana, Ill,o 

October 5, 1945 

NAEB HOLDS HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL CONVENTION 

TWENTY REPRESENT ATf VES FROM NAEB MEMBER STATIONS CONVENED IN THE MADI¬ 
SON Room of the LaSalle Hotel, September 17 and 13 for two days of pro¬ 
vocative DISCUSSION and exchange of ideas on educational broadcasting,, 
When the meetings were concluded Tuesday afternoon, everybody in attend¬ 
ance AGREED THAT IT HAD BEEN ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CONVENTIONS IN 
YEARS* 

The Monday morning session was given over to station reports. There 

WERE MANY NEW AND INTERESTING PROGRAM IDEAS SUCH A S t (l) THE CURTIS 

Childrens Program—prepared by the Curtis Publishing Company but a 

VERY GOOO NON-COMMERCIAL CHILDRENS SHOW NEVERTHELESS (COLEMAN OF WKA^); 

(2) Sowa Editors Program-lives, opinions, and philosophies of Iowa 

NEWS 0 APER EDITORS COLLECTED BY THE JOURNAL«SM STAFF AND PREPARED INTO 
A RADIO SCRIPT (MENZER WSU I ); (3) CHILDREN^ %SZ~~A REGULAR OUI7 SHOW 

FOR CHILDREN WITH THE QUESTIONS BEARING ON GRAMMAR, LITERATURE, SPELL¬ 
ING, etc, (Menzer WSUl); (4) i Saw ? t Hap°en—a script on recent events 

PREPARED FROM THE ACTUAL PUBLISHED WORK OF SOME ONE WHO WAS ON THE SPOT 
WHEN THE EVENT TOOK PLACE, (MILLER KUOM ); (5) EnC -RE PROGRAM —A REPEAT 
PERFORMANCE OF ONE OF THE BEST SHOWS ON THE STATION DURING THE WEEK, 

(McCarty WHA)* There were many others reported which should be men¬ 
tioned HERE BUT LACK OF SPACE AND THE TEMPERATURE OF YE EDITOR’S NOTES 
PREVENTS THEIR INCLUSION, 

The REPORT ON BUDGETS WAS INTERESTING, MOST OF THE STA"IONS ARE EX¬ 
PANDING THEIR BUDGETS * SEVERAL WEFE ALMOST DOUBLED, WO I AND WKAR 
ARE SPONSORING THEIR FOOTBALL BROADCASTS 0 WCHU TAKES OMME RC f A L PRO¬ 
GRAMS TO DEFRAY OPERATION EXPENSES IN ORDER TO FINANCE THEIR EDUCATIONAL 
PROGRAMS., WHA PUT THRU A BUDGET ITEM OF OVER $70*000 FOR FM STATIONS 
IN THE LAST HOURS OF THE LEGISLATIVE S£SSION--BILL HARLEY DID THE LOBBY¬ 
ING, WKAR gets Federal Ag 9 assistance for their budget* WNYC has no 

BUDGET WORRIES AS LONG AS THEY CONTINUE TO DO THE JOB, 

Reports on the staffing of stations showed that stations reporting 

OPERATED WITH SURPRISINGLY LARGE STAFFS, a LARGE PART OF MOST OF THE 
OPERATING BUDGETS WERE FOR SALARIES AND IMAGES, 

There seemed, from these station reports, to be an increasing trend to¬ 
ward ON THE SPOT PICKUPS FOR EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTS, WHA KEEPS ITS 
RECORDING TRUCK BUSY CONSTANTLY* WO I HAS A WIRE RECORDER FOR OUTSIDE 
PICKUPS, WNYC GOES ALL OVER NEW YORK Cl TV %0 GET EDUCATIONAL AND CUL¬ 
TURAL PROGRAMS * W03(J MAKES MANY. MOBILE PICKUPS USING SHORTWAVE * SO 

MUCH FOR THE STATION REPORTS 0 



MAE9 NEWS LETTER 


... .Page 2 


October i, 3 945 


The afternoon session was devoted to a discussion of FM Educational 

STATIONS and FM OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS* PRACTICALLY ALL OF THE STATIONS 
REPORTING INDICATED THAT THEY WERE CONTEMPLATING FM STATIONS IN THE 

FUTUREo Some operators were very hot on FM as a medium for educational 

BROADCAST 8 NG WHILE OTHERS WERE COOL BUT WERE PLANNING STATIONS ANYWAY 
AS A PROTECTION AGAINST FUTURE CHANGES., ALL AGREED THAT THE STATIONS 
SHOULD BE FULLY PROGRAMMED TO BE SUCCESSFULTHERE WAS CONSIDERABLE 
DISCUSSION ON THE MERIT OF THE 40 - 15,000 CYCLE AUDIO FREQUENCY RE¬ 
SPONSE REQUIREMENT WITH NO CONCLUSIONS REACHED* 

RepRESENTATI VES FROM RCA MANUFACTURING Co *, GENERAL ELECTRIC Co », AND 
Gates American Corporation met in panel discussion on prospects for 

NEW EQUIPMENT* THEY REPORTED THAT AUDIO EQUIPMENT WAS COMING ALONG 
NICELY AND ONLY THE TRANSFORMER SITUATION WAS HOLDING UP FULL PRODUCTION 

Deliveries would be slow on FM equipment and there is a large backlog 
of orders None of the experts present could see high power FM EQUIP¬ 
MENT for several years. 

The first part of the Tuesday morning session was devoted to a discuss¬ 
ion of Surplus Property Disposal* Carl Menzer explained the present 
status of the efforts to obtain surplus raoio equipment for use by ed¬ 
ucational institutions. He and your eoitor are members of a committee 
set up by the U,S, Office of Education to provide ways and me*ns to 

CHANNEL THIS EQUIPMENT TO EDUCATION, MANY OF THE DIFFICULT PROBLEMS 
WHICH THE PROJECT FACES WERE OUTLINED AND THE PREPARATION OF A MASTER 
EQUIPMENT LIST BY THIS COMMITTEE WAS DESCRIBED, THERE WAS CONSIDERABLE 
DISCUSSION OF THE WHOLE TOPIC BY ALL PRESENT« On A MOTION BY NOVIK OF 
WNYC THE NAEB PASSED THE FOLLOWING: 

1, Menzer and Ebel be appointed as an NAEB Surplus Property 
Committee* 

2 All stations be instructed to prepare lists of needed 

EQUIPMENT COPIES OF WHICH THEY WOULD PASS ALONG TO THE 
ABOVE COMMITTEE* 

3, • Expenses, if needed, be underwritten by the NAEB* 

The second half of the morning ano part of the afternoon was spent in 
a discussion of the clear channel problem* Hanna of WCHU explained 
their stand and the basis for their appearance at the hearing Cole¬ 
man of WKAR, and Griffith of WOI did likewise* Ebel presented a plan 

FOR ALLOCATING ALL EDUCATIONAL STATIONS TO CLEAR CHANNELS BY RESTRICT¬ 
ING CLEAR CHANNEL PROTECTION TO THE SAME VALUE AS REGIONAL CHANNEL PRO¬ 
TECTION, The ALLOCATIONS HAD A NUMBER OF ENGINEERING BUGS AND WAS ONLY 
PRESENTED TO PROVIDE SOME STARTING POINT FOR DISCUSSION OF THE PROBLEM, 

Hanna countered with Prof* Smithes clear channel proposal which makes 

LOTS OF SENSE, THE OUTCOME OF ALL THE HEATED DISCUSSION WHICH FOLLOWED 

WAS THE Clear Channel Resolution, a copy of which you have already re¬ 
ceived* Furthermore the president was instructed to appoint one of 

THE MEMBERS OF THE CLEAR CHANNEL COMMITTEE TO APPEAR FOR THE ORGANIZA¬ 
TION AT THE COMING CLEAR CHANNEL HEARINGS* 



NAEB NEWS LETTER 


Page 3 


October I, 1945 


The reminder of Tuesday afternoon—after the clear channel smoke had 

CLEARED A WA Y*~ —WAS DEVOTED TO A BUSINESS MEETING* THE FOLLOWING SLATF. 
OF OFFICERS WAS NOMINATED BY THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE AND UNANIMOUSLY 
ELECTED« 


President 

Frank E* Schooley, WILL 
Uni VERS!TY OF ILLINOIS 
Urbana, Illinois 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

Allen Miller, KOAC 

Oregon State System of Higher Education 
Corvallis, Oregon 

Treasurer 

W „ I » Griffith, WOI 
Iowa State College 
Ames, Iowa 

Executive Committee 
R, d , Coleman, WKAR 
John W* Dunn, WNAD 
Richard B* Hull, WOI 
Carl H* Menzer, WSUI 
di!M Miles, WBAA 
M .» So NoVS K, WNYC 

Executive Secretary 
A o James Ebel, WILL 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 

A proposal by John W* Ouimn for a suitable plaque to indicate NAEB member¬ 
ship was referred to the Executive Committee because of a lack of time 

FOR DISCUSSION OF THE PROJECT* 

Carl Menzer set forth the necessity for coordinated planning for State 
FM Networks if they are ro work together on an interstate basis and if 
INTERFERENCE IS TQ PREVENTED* a CONFERENCE OF STATE NET PLANNERS 
WAS SUGGESTED, It WAS DECIDED THAT THE PRESIDENT SHOULD HANDLE THIS 
MATTER AND TRY TO ARRANGE FOR SUCH A CONFERENCE THRU CONTACT WITH THE 

FCC and the U„S* Office of Education* The reports of the treasurer, 

THE SECRETARY, AND THE RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE WERE ACCEPTED WITH THANKS* 

The over-packed agenda did not allow for a report by Morrie Novik (WNYC) 
.of his European Radio Tour so by informal agreement the convention was 

EXTENDED BEYOND THE CLOSING T (I ME TO HEAR THIS REPORT * 

Based upon his recent tour of the ETO which included all the major 
European capitals and broadcasting stations, Mr c Novik declared that 
’’The program schedules of a great many European broadcasting systems are 
at their weakest, and ii n the poorest condition as regards imagination, 
interest, and audience appeal due to the very small budgets allotted for 


NAE8 NEWS LETTER 


Page 4 


October I, 1945 


PROGRAMMING o" ’’HOWEVER, 1 ' NOVIK WENT ON, "EOUCATI ONAL, UNIVERSITY, AND 
STATE-OWNED RADIO STATIONS IN THIS COUNTRY HAVE A GREAT DEAL TO LEARN 

from the European stations," 

In attendance at the convention were: Bob Coleman* WKAR; Carl Menzer, 
WSUI; Burton Holmberg, KUOM; Hunnington Miller, KUOM; I * Keith Tyler, 
WOSU; John Henderson, WBAA; Armon Bonney, WSU!; M*C* Jensen, WCALf F* E, 
Schooley, WILL; A,J, Ebel, WILL; John Stiehl, WHA; H,B* McCarty, WHA; 
Bill Harley, WHA; Mrs, Grover, WCHU; Mike Hanna, WCHU; WJ. Griffith, 

WOI ; Oick Hull, WOf; Prof, Webb, KUOM; Prof. Rook, KFJM; Morris Novik, 
WNYC o 

ABBOT R£ n ORTS IN 


Here is a letter from Waldo Abbot explaining his absence from the con¬ 
vention? 

Dear Jim: 

| WANT TO THANK YOU FOR YOUR KSNQNESS IN GIVING ME ADViCE ON 
WHAT STUDIOS TO SEE IN PREPARATION FOR OUR CONSTRUCTION OF STUDIOS AT 

the University of Michigan. II went off with the architects and visited 
WGY making a very thorough study of their AM, FM and television studios 
At 6bs in N ev .. York, we were taken through the studio building and saw 

THEIR TRANSMITTER FOR FM AND THE CONTROL ROOM„ NBC EVEN SHOWED US 
STUDIOS THAT MOST OF THE PEOPLE AROUND THERE DIDN 8 T/ KNOW ABOUT; ES¬ 
PECIALLY ON THAT IS THE PROCESS OF CONSTRUCTION. 

Eo Content at WOR conducted us through three new studios that 

THEY ARE BUILDING ON THE FIRST FLOOR OF THEIR BUILDING, He HAS REALLY 
MADE A STUDY OF ACOUSTICS AND THE SHAPES OF SOME OF THE STUDIOS GIVE 
ME THE HEEBY-JEEBIES, BUT THEY REACT ALRIGHT ON SOUND. L ESLIE JOY 
DOWN AT KYW WAS WONDERFUL,, He EVEN TURNED OVER TO US ALL THE PLANS 
AND SPECIFICATIONS FOR THEIR STUDIO BUILDING. WE SAW NOT ONLY STUDIOS 
AND CONTROL ROOMS, BUT AIR CONDITI ON ING»--LOTS OF INFORMATION, 

! EXPECT THAT THEY WILL TEAR DOWN MORRIS HALL VERY EARLY IN 
1946 AND CONSTRUCT THE NEW §ERVICE BUILDING. UNIVERSITY BROADCASTING 
FACILITIES WILL BE ON THE FIFTH FLOOR OF THIS NEW STRUCTURE AND WILL 
INCLUDE FOUR STUDIOS, THE LARGEST OF WHICH WILL BE 28 X 40; THREE STUDIO 
CONTROL ROOMS AND A MASTER CONTROL; OFFICE AND RECEPTION ROOM FOR ME; 
CONTINUITY ROOM AND A SCRIPT ROCMJ MUSIC LIBRARY AND SOUND EFFECT ROOM; 
AND A LARGE LOBBY IN THe MEANTIME THE UNIVERSITY IS CONSTRUCTING TWO 
STUDIOS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH IN ANGELL HALL WHICH WILL BE TEM¬ 
PORARY DURING THE CONSTRUCTION PERIOD FOR THE BROADCASTING OF OUR PRO¬ 
GRAMS-, We ARE PROGRESSING AS RAPIDLY AS POSSIBLE UNDER THE PM CON¬ 
STRUCTION Permit, but are being held VP by change in the transmitter 

SITE AND BY LACK OF EOUIPMENT o 

There 8 s some news for your letter. Sorry i didn^t get to the 
Chicago meeting, but 1 expect to get a report on it from you. 

Cordially yours, 


Waldo Abbot 



NAEB MEWS LETTER 


Page 5 


Ocro ber I , \ 945 


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PLANS AN FM STATION 

Doctor Nicholas Murray Butler has announced that Columbia University 

PLANS TO ESTABLISH ITS OWN FREQUENCY MODULATION RADIO STATION* THE 
RETIRING PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY SAID IT WAS PLANNED TO BROADCAST 
EVENING COURSES IN SCHIENCE, SOC«OLOGY, HISTORY, LANGUAGES AND INTER¬ 
NATIONAL AFFIARSo 

SCHOOL BROADCAST COMMENCE PROGRAM SET 

—.— - —-■—•——■—-—■ “ ——' * 

A FULL TWO OAY PROGRAM FOR THE NINTH ANNUAL SCHOOL BROADCAST CONFERENCE 
HELD iN CH 5 CAGO OCTOBER 22 AND 23 HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED FEATURED WILL 
BE THREE CLASS ROOM DEMONSTRATION SESSIONS WITH HERVEY AlLEN, AUTHOR 

of ’’Anthony Adverse”, Malcome Clare, radio story teller, and Frank 
Ernest Hill, writer, commentator, and moderator as guest speakers, a 

JOINT SESSION OF THE ILLINOIS R,T,A„ AND THE ILLINOIS FEDERATION OF 

Women 4 s Clubs Radio Chairmen will be held Monday afternoon* Also that 
afternoon there will be a demonstration of Frequency Modulation Broad¬ 
casting DIRECT FROM THE CONFERENCE * 

Luncheons are planned for both days with outstanding speakers scheduled* 
The Tuesday session will be devoted largely to w/ork study groups and 

THE FINAL OPEN MEETING* A NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS HAVE SCHEDULED SPACE 
FOR PRESENTATION OF NEW MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT, AND IDEAS* THE SBC MEETS 

at the Morrison* 

DURR CRITIZES COMMERCIALS 

Federal Communications Commissioner Clifford Durr sharply criticized 

RADIO COMMERCIALS* OURR EXPRESSED THE OPINION THAT RADIO IS BECOMING 
PREOOMINANTLY AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM AND ASSERTED THAT PROGRAM PRODUCTION 
IS BEING TAKEN OVER BY ADVERTISERS AND ADVERTISING AGENCIES* 

Said Ourr: ’’News of the greatest importance is sometimes overwhelmed 

and DEPRIVED OF ITS SIGNIFICANCE BY THE COMMERCE ADVERTISEMENTS WHICH 
PRECEDE, INTERRUPT AND FOLLOW/ IT*” AND HE ADDED THAT SOME BROADCASTERS 
FIGHT AGAINST THIS TREND EUT THEIR BATTLE IS AN UPHILL ONE * 

Durr made the statements in an address to the Christ Church Forum in 

New/ York* 

WILL STAFF CHANGES 

LANSON Fo DEMMING, MUSICAL DIRECTOR OF WILL FOR THE PAST SIX Y£>RS "V3 
RESIGNED THIS POSITION TO GO TO HOUSTON, TEXAS AS MINISTER OF V 51C AT 

Sr. Paul’s Methodist Church* Tens is a grand advancement for l and 

THE BEST V/ISHES OF ALL OF THE WAEBeRS GO 'WITH HIM 

George Sharp has been appointed Educational Program Director r: the- 
STATION. This 3S a NEW' position created to improve AND broaden : HE 
SCOPE OF WILL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTS* MR. SHARP COMES f ROM *" H ~ 

Summer Radio Institution at Northwestern and has had wide experience 

IN THE FIELD OF DRAMA* 

Margot Morris, formerly of wha and more recently of WDW3, has 







NAES NEWS LETTER 


Page 6 


October I , I!945 


PLATED I N CHARGE OF THE WILL CONTINUITY DEPARTMENT* FOR THE PAST SEVERAL 
MONTHS SHE HAS BEEN WORKING WITH ArMEDA KOIVSSTO IN THE PREPARATION OF 
MUSICAL SCRIPTS AND IN THE REORGANIZATION OF THE MUSIC LIBRARY TO IN¬ 
CLUDE a Theasarus Transcription service. Miss Koivisto is leaving this 

MONTH TO CONTINUE HER STUDV OF MUSIC AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 

GEORGIA TECH MUST OPERATE OWN STATION 

The Communications Commission proposes to deny a renewal of license to 
Georgia Tech’s Radio Station WGST, Atlanta, unless the operators break 
connections with the Southern Broadcasting Stations, Snc* 

Announcing its proposed decision on the stations application fop renewal 

OF LICENSES, THE COMMISSION SAID IT HAD FOUND A RENEWAL H WOULD NCI SERVE 
THE PUBLIC INTEREST, CONVENIENCE OR NECESSITY," THE COMMISSION PROPOSED 
TO DENY THE APPLICATION "WITHOUT PREJUDICE*" 

The station was given 90 days in which to submit a new application for 

A CONSTRUCTION PERM 1T AND LICENSE TO OPERATE ON ITS SAME FREQUENCY OF 

920 KILOCYCLES* 

The new application* the Commission said, must show that "No further 

EFFECT IS GIVEN TO AGREEMENTS BETWEEN GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY AND 

the Southern Broadcasting Stations, Inc 0 w 

The agreements, the Commission said, were contrary to the Communications 
Act and incompatible with operation of the station i n the public interest 


Since the decision >s not yet final, a commission spokesman said the 
station may continue to operate and may ask for oral argument to REVIEW 
THE COMM* SS»on®S PROPOSED DECISION* 

THIS AND THAT 


M0RRIE NOVIK SAYS THAT THE T PE RECORDER HE HEARD IN EUROPE IS SO FAR 
SUPERIOR TO ANYTHING IN THIS COUNTRY THAT THERE IS NO COMPARISON 
WO I I IKES THEIR RESULTS FROM THEIR WIRE RECORDER » *WILL HAS JUST STARTED 
USING THEIR NEW WIRE RECORDER AND.ARE GETTING SATISFACTORY RESULTS ON 
SPEECH* * « « , * V E CHANGED THE MIKE AND TRIMMED UP THE OUTPUT CIRCUIT FOR 
DUBBING PURPOSES* o ° THE NEW RCA FM RECEIVER CIRCUIT SOUNDS ! NT F.. E ST¬ 
ING . ... ANDREW HaMMERSCHM! DT, FORMER CHIEF ENGINEER FOR WOSU, WAS DUE OF 
TWO NBC TELEVISION ENGINEERS STRANDED iN THE EMPIRE STATE BU ILD; Ki DUR¬ 
ING THE RECENT ELEVATOR STft I KE •.•. .HAVE YOU GOTTEN YOUR TRANSMIT- MO 
EQUIPMENT BACK UP to PREWAR POWER YET?., , . * * If YOU WANT 10 MONKEY - L-Nt 
V5;J TH FIGURES THAT MEANS A 25$ INCREASE IN POWER. .‘UNFORTUNATE LY A ‘ 5f ■ 
INCREASE IN POWER DOESN * T MEAN MUCH AS FAR AS THE LISTENERS ARE MC1RNEO 

boy does that return to standard time hit us daytime oper dps 

lx THE V£CK ....Mm for war TIME THE YEAR AROUND—CAN 4 T EVEN GET :*:•••• DONE 
AROUND the house with that sun going down so soon,.. The tube j e 

Pdally SCRATCHING their HEADS TO COME up WITH SOMETHING FOR HIGH PO-iR 
A1 |Q( yjEQACYCLES. . * . • .WHEN THE Y 00 j BE T YOU WON 1 T REC£ 5NIZ H • ’ 

A e A PA*:!0 tube* ...The FCO monitoring program to determine PRO pa V n 

characteristics at the high frequencies closed OCT0 3-.F I .. • R “ 

BE a REPORT AVAILABLE TN SC VERAL WEEKS WHICH SHOULD *•>' ?’Y i nte 




N4E8 NEWS LETTER 


Page 7 


October ), 1945 


SNG,».o oCaRL MENZER COMMENTED ON SOME OF THE MEASUREMENTS AT TmE fOWA 

City monitor* ng station during our convention FM oi scus.s i ons .Clear 
Channel data from youse guys is com < ng in too slow* <?eno in the in¬ 
formation ASKED FOR IN CARL * S LETTER PRONTO* . * . «NOTE ALSO THAT YOU HAVE 
AN EQUIPMENT LIST TO PREPARE FOR THE SURPLUS PROPERTY COMMITTEE* PUT 
YOUR CHIEF ENGINEER TO WORK ON THE JOB; HE IS JUST A LAZY BUM WI TH 
NOTHING TO DO ANYWAY * (TO MY BROTHER ENGINEERS: FO R THE ABOVE DIS¬ 

GRACE, I WILL HARI-KARI ON THE TOP OF OUR 325 FOOT TOWER AT LOCAL SUN¬ 
SET tomorrow*) Sorry to hear that Jim Miles was hospital zed nd couldn t 

ATTEND THE CONVENTION,, BROTHER HENDERSON DSD A SWELL JOB FOR BAA 
BUT WE MISSED JlM GLAD TO REPORT THAT HE »S OK NOW** « * •CAN YOU IMAGINE 
ANY ORGANIZATION PROPAGATING A SHEET LIKE THIS BY REAPPOINTING YOUR 
HUMBLE EDITOR? All GOES TO SHOW YOU W'HA T A SEVERE MANPOWER SHORTAGE 
WILL DO* 

LAST F LAS Hi CL CAR CHANNEL HEARING POSTPONED A^AIN 

The Federal Commun i cat sons Commission has just postponed from 0 C t O 3er 
23rd to January Kth a hearing to consider changes in Clear Channel 
Broadcasting* 

The Commission also denied the petition of the Clear Channel Broadcast¬ 
ing Service for an indefinite postponement of the hear ng* 

In a statement, the Commission said its engineering committees cannon- 
complete the Clear Channel survey before January* 

The hearing was ordered last February 20th to determine what changes, 
if any, should be made in the present policies for allocating so-called 
♦’Clear Channels’* in the standard radio broadcast band 0 

At that time the Commission said {, A re-examination of present Clear 
Channel allocations is necessary since commission studies reveal there 
are still large areas within the United States which receive no radio 

SERVICE AT ALL DURING DAYTIME HOURS AND NO PRIMARY RADIO SERV E AT 
NIGHT," 

| n ADDITION, THE COMMISSION HAS RECEIVED MANY APPLICATIONS TO OPERATE 
ADDITIONAL STATIONS ON CLEAR CHANNELS AND TO USE POWER IN EXCESS OF 
50,000 WATTS, THE MAXIMUM NOW PERMITTED A CLEAR CHANNEL STATION, 

A clear channel is defined as *qne on WHICH the DOMINANT stat u cr 
STATIONS RENDER SERVICE OVER W!OE AREAS AND WHICH ARE CLEAR OF OBJECT¬ 
IONABLE INTERFERENCE WITHIN THEIR PRIMARY SERVICE AREAS AND OVR ALL 
OR A SUBSTANTIAL PORTION OF THEIR SECONDARY SERVICE AREA* 


ESc'L 





V 


clear channel resolution : 

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters, 
ASSEMBLED AT CHICAGO SEPTEMBER 17-18, 1945, RESOLVED TO SUBMIT 

to the Federal Communications Commission its position 'aith 
relation to the pending Clear Channel heaping* 

I , tN ITS REVIEW of* THE EVIDENCE SUBMITTED AT THIS 
hearing, the Commission is urged to consider the unique public 

SERVICES RENDERED 8V THE EOUCATI NAL AND NON-PROFIT RADIO STAT¬ 
IONS OF THE COUNTRY, 

A STUDY OF THE RECORD OF THESE STATIONS MUST RE¬ 
VEAL THE TYPE OF SERVICE V'HICH IS NOT DUPLICATED BY ANY OTHER 
GROUP OF STATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, THEIR OPERATION IS TRULY 
IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST, CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY*. 

2o The Association urges that the Commission seriously 

CONSIDER THE CONTENTION THAT THE PRINCIPLE OF PUBLIC SET VICE MUST 
PREVAIL OVER THE TRADITIONAL YARDSTICK OF THE PROTECTION OF UN¬ 
REASONABLE COVERAGE «. 

3, The resources of America 9 s leading educational 

I NS I TUT I ONS SHOULD BE AVAILABLE TO ALL v YET THE BROADCAST FAC¬ 
ILITIES OF THESE STATIONS ARE AT THIS TIME SO LIMITED IN TERMS 
OF PjDY'ER, FREQUENCY AND HOURS OF OPERATION TR A T ONLY A PORTION OF 
THE AVAILABLE SERVICE IS BE i-NG BROADCAST . 

4 3 Our members are ready and, because of years of 

BROADCAST EXPERIENCE, ARE ABLE TO CARRY ON AN EXPANDED RADIO SERVICE, 

The National Association of educational Broadcasters 

,; s*. OL C 7 f J L L * URGES THAT THE RULES REGARDING CLEAR CnAMNLL OPERA¬ 
TION BE REVISED, REVISION SHOULD BE SUCH THAT FULL-TIME OPERATION, 


- 2 - 


SUFFICIENT nOV“E;R, AND IMPROVED FACILITIES 8E MADE POSSIBLE IN 
OROER TO PROVIDE AOEOUATE SERVICE TO LISTENERS IN THOSE AREAS 
V'HfCH THE EDUCATIONAL STATIONS SHOULD RIGHTFULLY SERVE,, 


Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


'oiTu> c KTwe 
\\KWAVEs 


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